Search
College of Arts and Sciences

Germanic Studies

Courses

Semester:

GER-G 503 THEORIES&MTHD STDY GER LT CLTR (31221)

Instructor: Turk, Johannes
Day & Time: W 4:00 PM- 6:15 PM
Building & Room: Ballantine Hall 235
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2017-08-21 End Date: 2017-12-15

Introduction to Theory The term ¿theory¿ is derived from the Greek word theoria, which means ¿contemplation, viewing, sight.¿ By the time it is imported into English, it has come to signify ¿conception¿ or ¿scheme.¿ Although it can be used in the sense of method or explanation, its stakes are higher. Theory asks us to abandon the shores of preconception and set sail for the possibilities of thought. Theory also entertains a close relationship to a way of life as the compound bios theoreticos shows and encloses an appeal to change your life. This class is meant to introduce you to fundamental concepts and problems of theory. We will explore core dimensions of thought from mimesis to aesthetics, language, and politics, and ask how concepts shape our grasp of what can be experienced, understood, thought, and felt. Readings will include texts reaching from Plato and Aristotle to Heidegger, Freud, Derrida, and Rancière.

GER-G 548 GERMAN PHONETICS & PHONOLOGY (31027)

Instructor: Hall, Tracy Alan
Day & Time: MW 2:30 PM- 3:45 PM
Building & Room: Woodburn Hall 119
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2017-08-21 End Date: 2017-12-15

Phonology is the branch of linguistics devoted to sound structure. This course is an accelerated introduction to the study of the phonology of Modern German (supplemented with a brief overview of phonetics) within recent, mainstream generative theory, with emphasis on description, analysis and argumentation. Students will become familiar with some of the central issues in phonological theory and the relevance of the German data to these issues. We will discuss several areas of German segmental phonology, including the structure of affricates, the ach/ich alternation and laryngeal features (i.e. Final Devoicing). No background in linguistics is assumed. German is not a prerequisite for this course. All readings will be in English. Course material will be in the form of instructor-generated handouts. G548 can be taken more than once for credit. The course grade will be based on the following criteria: problem sets, a squib, a short paper (ca. 10 pages) and class participation. Required reference work: Mangold, Max; et al. (2015) Duden Aussprachewörterbuch: Wörterbuch der deutschen Standardaussprache. (Duden, Band 6.) 7. Auflage. ISBN 978-3-411-04067-4. Optional textbook: Hall, T. A. (2011). Phonologie. Eine Einführung. Berlin: De Gruyter. 2. Auflage. ISBN 978-3-11-021587-8

GER-G 599 THESIS RESEARCH (4404)

Instructor: Gade, Kari Ellen
Day & Time: 12:00 AM- 12:00 AM
Building & Room:
Credit Hours: 0.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2017-08-21 End Date: 2017-12-15

GER-G 605 SPECIAL TOPICS TEACHING GERMAN (31028)

Instructor: Even, Susanne
Day & Time: TR 2:30 PM- 3:45 PM
Building & Room: Woodburn Hall 118
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2017-08-21 End Date: 2017-12-15

Topic: Advanced Explorations into Foreign Language Education Course description Teaching a foreign language means more than just familiarizing students with syntax, semantics, and pragmatics of the language in question, since learning a language is more than the acquisition of knowledge about its words, structures, and usage. This course is designed as a follow-up to G500 (College Language Teaching), with a focus on literature, linguistics, and cultural studies. Specifically, we are going to look at broader issues like lesson and course design, syllabus construction, and curriculum development. By the end of this course you should have learned to integrate your knowledge about foreign language teaching with particular content areas, given lectures, taught sample lessons, put together course syllabi based on your fields of expertise, and gained more in-depth notions/visions of pedagogical approaches. Course Reading ¿ John Dewey (1997). Experience and Education. New York, Touchstone. ¿ Selected articles, book chapters, and URLs (on CANVAS)

GER-G 623 INTELLCTL HIST&PHIL TRADITIONS (34211)

Instructor: Rasch, William W.
Day & Time: MW 2:30 PM- 3:45 PM
Building & Room: Ballantine Hall 235
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2017-08-21 End Date: 2017-12-15

Topic: Philosophical Discourse of Modernity: 20th Century We may never have been modern, as Bruno Latour has suggested, but we sure as hell think we have. Both structurally (base) ¿ the move from feudal to bourgeois society, as Marx had it; or the move from stratified (hierarchical) to function differentiation, as Luhmann postulates ¿ and semantically (superstructure), the eighteenth century marks the definitive period of transition. Robert Pippin claims for German Idealism (Kant to Hegel and Marx) the honor of executing the first philosophical reflection on emergent modernity; and Reinhart Koselleck¿s Begriffsgeschichte (history of concepts) attempts to chart the eighteenth-century changes in meaning of fundamental terms as a seismographic picture of tectonic shifts occurring in the social structure at the time. Had we world enough and time, this is where we would start. Instead, we pick up the story in mid-stream. The critique of reason initiated by Kant (in the attempt to purge it of metaphysical detritus) and continued by his successors (especially Hegel and Marx) was most radically pursued by Nietzsche. We start our investigation with the scorched earth that Nietzsche left behind. The traditional discourse of modernity (as presented here) is a European and Eurocentric phenomenon. Furthermore, the narrative I have constructed is largely a German one, though it includes Lyotard, Foucault, and a number of Anglophone commentators. Even as a German narrative it is woefully incomplete, neglecting, for example, contributions by Freud and Blumenberg. As Luhmann will tell us at the end of the semester, forced selectivity and reduction of complexity due to temporal constraints is, in fact, a major feature of modernity; so please view the narrative of modernity presented here as a self-referential reflection of the object it describes. The main requirement of the course is the ability to read both a fairly large quantity of texts and fair subset of texts closely. Writing assignments will be limited to bi-weekly response papers. I hope to see improvement in the quality of the responses as knowledge of the motifs cumulates over the 15 weeks of the semester. By the end of the course you should be able roughly to situate other purveyors of the ¿philosophical discourse of modernity¿ in the narrative provided here, thereby expanding, amplifying, revising, and otherwise altering it. The hope is that you will be provoked to move both forward (into the twenty-first century) and backward (to the nineteenth and eighteenth centuries) in time, as well as laterally to expand the themes to include what has been neglected here (race, gender, class being the obvious subjects that will have been only grazed).

GER-G 625 LIT AND CULTURE:SPECIAL TOPICS (33348)

Instructor: Rasch, William W.
Day & Time: F 7:00 PM- 9:30 PM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 0005
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2017-08-21 End Date: 2017-12-15

GER-G 635 OLD ICELANDIC (31026)

Instructor: Gade, Kari Ellen
Day & Time: MW 4:00 PM- 5:15 PM
Building & Room: Woodburn Hall 205
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2017-08-21 End Date: 2017-12-15

The object of the course is to give an introduction to Old Norse language and literature. The focus will be on linguistic aspects (phonology, morphology, and syntax), with sidelights to the literary, cultural, and mythological traditions. Select passages from E. V. Gordon, An Introduction to Old Norse will be translated and serve as a background for the lectures. The final grades will be based on class participation, a midterm, a final, and an oral presentation. Book: E.V. Gordon. 1988. An Introduction to Old Norse. Oxford: Clarendon. ISBN-13: 978-0198111849 ISBN-10: 0198111843

GER-G 815 INDIVIDUAL READINGS (2426)

Instructor: Gade, Kari Ellen
Day & Time: 12:00 AM- 12:00 AM
Building & Room:
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2017-08-21 End Date: 2017-12-15

GER-G 820 RESEARCH TUTORIAL (2427)

Instructor: Gade, Kari Ellen
Day & Time: 12:00 AM- 12:00 AM
Building & Room:
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2017-08-21 End Date: 2017-12-15

GER-G 835 SEM IN GERMANIC LINGUISTICS (34256)

Instructor: TBD
Day & Time: TR 4:00 PM- 5:15 PM
Building & Room: Cedar Hall C107
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2017-08-21 End Date: 2017-12-15

GER-G 835 SEM IN GERMANIC LINGUISTICS (34257)

Instructor: TBD
Day & Time: TR 4:00 PM- 5:15 PM
Building & Room: Cedar Hall C107
Credit Hours: 4.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2017-08-21 End Date: 2017-12-15

GER-G 850 MASTER'S PROJECT (2428)

Instructor: Gade, Kari Ellen
Day & Time: 12:00 AM- 12:00 AM
Building & Room:
Credit Hours: 1.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2017-08-21 End Date: 2017-12-15

GER-G 850 MASTER'S PROJECT (11902)

Instructor: Gade, Kari Ellen
Day & Time: 12:00 AM- 12:00 AM
Building & Room:
Credit Hours: 1.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2017-08-21 End Date: 2017-12-15

GER-G 875 RESEARCH IN GERMAN LITERATURE (4843)

Instructor: Gade, Kari Ellen
Day & Time: 12:00 AM- 12:00 AM
Building & Room:
Credit Hours: 12.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2017-08-21 End Date: 2017-12-15

GER-G 875 RESEARCH IN GERMAN LITERATURE (2429)

Instructor: Gade, Kari Ellen
Day & Time: 12:00 AM- 12:00 AM
Building & Room:
Credit Hours: 12.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2017-08-21 End Date: 2017-12-15

GER-G 885 RSRCH IN GERMANIC LINGUISTICS (2430)

Instructor: Gade, Kari Ellen
Day & Time: 12:00 AM- 12:00 AM
Building & Room:
Credit Hours: 12.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2017-08-21 End Date: 2017-12-15

GER-G 885 RSRCH IN GERMANIC LINGUISTICS (4844)

Instructor: Gade, Kari Ellen
Day & Time: 12:00 AM- 12:00 AM
Building & Room:
Credit Hours: 12.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2017-08-21 End Date: 2017-12-15

GER-G 901 ADVANCED RESEARCH (2431)

Instructor: Gade, Kari Ellen
Day & Time: 12:00 AM- 12:00 AM
Building & Room:
Credit Hours: 6.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2017-08-21 End Date: 2017-12-15

GER-K 501 BEGINNING NORWEGIAN I (2433)

Instructor: May, Gergana Gueorguieva
Day & Time: MTWF 11:15 AM- 12:05 PM
Building & Room: Ballantine Hall 231
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2017-08-21 End Date: 2017-12-15

The course will introduce you to the fundamentals of the Norwegian language and will provide you with the tools to function in an everyday context. You will be able to discuss daily topics such as food, weather, housing, clothing, health, likes/dislikes, and travel. Authentic cultural materials will be used whenever possible. Class meetings are an invaluable immersion experience; therefore, your attendance and participation are essential to being successful. Homework will deal with grammar exercises, but essay writing will gradually be required. Weekly quizzes, two tests and two oral exams will count toward the final grade. Books: Required books: A. Textbook: Manne, Gerd and Gölin Kaurin Nilsen. 2013. Ny i Norge. Oslo: Fag og Kultur. ISBN 9788211014955 B. Workbook: Manne, Gerd and Gölin Kaurin Nilsen. 2013. Ny i Norge. Oslo: Fag og Kultur. ISBN 978-82-11-01504-4 C. Vocabulary book: Manne, Gerd and Gölin Kaurin Nilsen. 2013. Ny i Norge. Oslo: Fag og Kultur. ISBN 978-82-11-01901-1 Recommended books: D. Grammar: Janus, Louis. 1996. Verbs and Essential Grammar. New York, etc: MacGraw¿Hill. ISBN 084428596X E. Dictionary Haugen, Einar. 1965. Norwegian¿English Dictionary. Madison, Wisconsin: Univ. of Wisconsin Press. ISBN 0299038742

GER-K 503 INTERMEDIATE NORWEGIAN I (4471)

Instructor: May, Gergana Gueorguieva
Day & Time: MWF 12:20 PM- 1:10 PM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 0005
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2017-08-21 End Date: 2017-12-15

Prerequisite: K100/K501 or permission of instructor. This course is a continuation of K100/K501. Course Description: The course will build on your existing knowledge of Norwegian, strengthening and expanding the language tools you already possess to make you able to move beyond the everyday topics and into more specialized areas of conversation. We will focus on your ability to narrate and describe in Norwegian, as well as to construct well-rounded paragraphs. Topics of discussion will include family life, housing, food, media, education, Norwegian history, literature and the welfare state. We will use mainly authentic cultural materials. You will be required to do all the reading at home. Class time will be devoted exclusively to conversation/discussion and going over specific grammar topics and exercises. There will be two comprehensive exams on your listening, reading and writing skills, focusing on particular grammar points. Weekly essays will also be required. We will start with short, half-page essays and gradually build to longer assignments. Books: Required books: A. Ellingsen, Elisabeth og Kirsti Mac Donald. Stein på stein. Tekstbok. Oslo. Cappelen. 2014. ISBN 9788202419646 B. Ellingsen, Elisabeth og Kirsti Mac Donald. Stein på stein. Arbeidsbok. Oslo. Cappelen. 2014. ISBN 9788202427979 Recommended books: E. Grammar: Janus, Louis. 1996. Verbs and Essential Grammar. New York, etc: MacGraw-Hill. ISBN 084428596X F. Dictionary Haugen, Einar. 1965. Norwegian-English Dictionary. Madison, Wisconsin: Univ. of Wisconsin Press. ISBN 0299038742

GER-N 505 ADVANCED DUTCH I (8005)

Instructor: Ham, Esther
Day & Time: MW 2:30 PM- 3:45 PM
Building & Room: Wendell W. Wright 1201
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2017-08-21 End Date: 2017-12-15

Required texts: 1 Van Dale Pocketwoordenboek Nederlands als tweede taal, Van Dale 2003 ISBN: 9789066480728 2 reader This hybrid course is designed to prepare students for reading of a variety of texts, from literature, magazine articles and other cultural based texts. In their oral and written responses to the readings, it is expected that students will demonstrate a growing awareness of - and sensibility to ¿ Dutch: language and culture and express their ideas in a manner that is consistent with advanced language work. We will build upon a wide range of language skills in N300: Reading: Throughout the course, we will be reading a variety of Dutch texts, mostly literary in nature. Speaking and listening: Spoken Dutch also constitutes an integral component of the course. You will be expected to participate actively in class discussions and group work. You will also do listening exercises in and outside of class pertaining to the materials heard on the website. Grammar: You are expected to have a good grasp of basic and intermediate Dutch grammar concepts. We will review foundational concepts throughout the course and you are responsible for reviewing grammar that still presents you with difficulties. Writing: A main focus of the course will be on writing in Dutch - to express ideas, convey information, and improve style and accuracy. We will also practice writing in a variety of different contexts. At times you will be asked to react to various materials. At other times, you will write longer and more structured essays. Grading will entail: quizzes, a midterm, a presentation, a couple of short papers and a final project.

GER-N 505 ADVANCED DUTCH I (9024)

Instructor: Ham, Esther
Day & Time: 12:00 AM- 12:00 AM
Building & Room: Bldg Not Assigned TBA
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2017-08-21 End Date: 2017-12-15

Required texts: 1 Van Dale Pocketwoordenboek Nederlands als tweede taal, Van Dale 2003 ISBN: 9789066480728 2 reader This hybrid course is designed to prepare students for reading of a variety of texts, from literature, magazine articles and other cultural based texts. In their oral and written responses to the readings, it is expected that students will demonstrate a growing awareness of - and sensibility to ¿ Dutch: language and culture and express their ideas in a manner that is consistent with advanced language work. We will build upon a wide range of language skills in N300: Reading: Throughout the course, we will be reading a variety of Dutch texts, mostly literary in nature. Speaking and listening: Spoken Dutch also constitutes an integral component of the course. You will be expected to participate actively in class discussions and group work. You will also do listening exercises in and outside of class pertaining to the materials heard on the website. Grammar: You are expected to have a good grasp of basic and intermediate Dutch grammar concepts. We will review foundational concepts throughout the course and you are responsible for reviewing grammar that still presents you with difficulties. Writing: A main focus of the course will be on writing in Dutch - to express ideas, convey information, and improve style and accuracy. We will also practice writing in a variety of different contexts. At times you will be asked to react to various materials. At other times, you will write longer and more structured essays. Grading will entail: quizzes, a midterm, a presentation, a couple of short papers and a final project.

GER-N 505 ADVANCED DUTCH I (35141)

Instructor: Ham, Esther
Day & Time: 12:00 AM- 12:00 AM
Building & Room:
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2017-08-21 End Date: 2017-12-15

GER-N 508 GOLDEN AGE OF DUTCH CULTURE (31111)

Instructor: Ham, Esther
Day & Time: MW 4:00 PM- 6:15 PM
Building & Room: Wylie Hall 101
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2017-10-16 End Date: 2017-12-15

Topic: Dutch footprints Taught in English; no prerequisites. Course open to graduates and undergraduates. In which respects is the Netherlands comparable to other countries, in which respects are the differences impossible to miss? And what are the reasons for these similarities and dissimilarities? How is the Netherlands connected to other countries, today and in the past? In this course, we will try to find answers to those questions, and for that reason we have to start in the past. So, we will start at the beginning of the 16th century and we will find out what happened to the Dutch and their endeavors in the world. We will discuss the Dutch Republic and what set them apart in Europe of that time, but we will move fast to the Dutch in Japan, Indonesia, and other places in the Far East. Several different texts will be analyzed and discussed, from scholarly works about the Dutch East India Company, travel diaries to literary texts. All literature will be read in translation and the course will be conducted in English. Grading will entail: weekly homework assignments, a couple of response papers and a final. Required texts: Reader

GER-V 815 INDIV RDGS IN GERMAN STUDIES (2438)

Instructor: Turk, Johannes
Day & Time: 12:00 AM- 12:00 AM
Building & Room:
Credit Hours: 8.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2017-08-21 End Date: 2017-12-15

GER-Y 501 BEGINNING YIDDISH I (12639)

Instructor: Posner, Allison Kendrick
Day & Time: MWF 9:30 AM- 10:45 AM
Building & Room: Ballantine Hall 335
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2017-08-21 End Date: 2017-12-15

GER-Y 503 INTERMEDIATE YIDDISH I (31144)

Instructor: Kerler, Dov-Ber Boris
Day & Time: 12:00 AM- 12:00 AM
Building & Room:
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2017-08-21 End Date: 2017-12-15

GER-Y 506 TOPICS IN YIDDISH CULTURE (31122)

Instructor: Kerler, Dov-Ber Boris
Day & Time: MW 4:00 PM- 6:15 PM
Building & Room: Ballantine Hall 347
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2017-10-16 End Date: 2017-12-15

GER-Y 815 INDIV READINGS IN YIDDISH STDS (2440)

Instructor: Kerler, Dov-Ber Boris
Day & Time: 12:00 AM- 12:00 AM
Building & Room:
Credit Hours: 4.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2017-08-21 End Date: 2017-12-15

Germanic Studies
Global and International Studies Building 3103
355 North Jordan Ave.
Bloomington, IN 47405-1105
Phone: 812-855-1553
Fax: 812-855-8927