College of Arts and Sciences

Germanic Studies

Courses

Semester:

GER-G 575 HIST STUDY OF GERMAN LIT III (30613)

Instructor: Weiner, Marc A.
Day & Time: TR 2:30 PM- 3:45 PM
Building & Room: Lindley Hall 019
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2019-01-07 End Date: 2019-05-03

Topic: Music in German Culture The course is intended to fulfill two goals: 1) to familiarize students with some canonical, representative works of German music and the cultural issues with which they have been associated; and 2) in so doing, to employ and examine a series of (sometimes competing) methodologies and questions brought to bear in the investigation of different aesthetic constructs and historical and cultural moments. The course is organized around the discussion of diverse musical genres (Lied, song cycle, symphony, opera, music drama, jazz), and literary and other aesthetic forms (poetry, prose narrative, novel, film). It also will make reference to various philosophical and aesthetic-theoretical concerns (as expressed by Kant, Hegel, Schopenhauer, Hanslick, Nietzsche, Adorno), and to the material and institutional framework within which music unfolded in German-speaking Europe from the late 18th- to the mid-20th centuries (salon, concert, Opera, criticism & feuilleton). The course will include consideration of the "New Musicology" (Abbate, Subotnik, McClary, Brett, Wheelock, Kramer, Leppert, Burnham, Goehr) and the work of cultural critics and historians of music (McGrath, Botstein, Treitler) that illustrates the expansion of formalist musical inquiry, as well as some debates and approaches that fall more squarely within the purview of Germanic Studies (Gilman, Pfitzner, Vaget, Weiner, Rasch, Levin). It would be useful (though it is not required) to be (roughly) familiar with the following terms: Affektenlehre, aria, atonality, cabaret, canon, chorale, coloratura, counterpoint, diegesis, dissonance, dodecaphony (= twelve-tone theory), Gesamtkunstwerk, Gregorian chant, harmony, improvisation, Interlude, interval, Kreuz (= sharp), l'art pour l'art, leitmotif (also Leitmotiv), melisma, mode, monophony, music drama, number opera, polyphony, potpourri, retrograde, score, serial music, sonata, sonata form, symphonic poem (= tone poem), symphony, tessitura, through-composed, tonality, Tonmalerei, Umkehrung (= inversion), vocal category, and Zeitoper. Good reference guides to such terms and matters are: the Harvard Brief Dictionary of Music, eds. Willi Apel & Ralph T. Daniel (New York: Washington Square Press, several editions) and The Norton/Grove Concise Encyclopedia of Music, eds. Stanley Sadie & Alison Latham, a relative of The New Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians (20 vols.), also available online. You should also know (roughly) what periods and styles are referred to by the following terms: Biedermeier, Classicism, Fin-de-Siècle, Futurism, Humanism, Impressionism, Modernism, Naturalism, Postmodernism, Realism, Romanticism, Sturm und Drang, Symbolism, and Verismo. Ideally, the course will provide a frame within which students may test and apply the various approaches and concerns they have encountered in the exploration of their own musical-cultural interests as they formulate a research project. In the final sessions, students will present, discuss, and mutually critique a lecture (of approx.. 20 minutes in length). Required Texts Music: A Style Sheet from The Editors of 19th-Century Music. Berkeley: U of California P, 1988. ISBN: 0-520-06382-1 (In Reference Section of Music Library: ML63.W78) Mann, Thomas. Doktor Faustus: Das Leben des deutschen Tonsetzers Adrian Leverkühn, erzählt von einem Freunde. Frankfurt a/M: Fischer Taschenbuch, 1997. ISBN-13: 978-3100484062. Mozart, Wolfgang Amadeus. Die Zauberflöte. Stuttgart: Reclam, #2620. ISBN-13: 978-3150026205. Nietzsche, Friedrich. Der Fall Wagner: Richard Wagner in Bayreuth, Der Fall Wagner, Nietzsche contra Wagner. Zenodot Verlagsgesellschaft, (14. Juni 2016) ISBN-13: 978-3843062961. Wagner, Richard. Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg. Ed. Wilhelm Zentner. Afterword Ulrich Karthaus. Stuttgart: Reclam, 1999. Reclam #5639. ISBN-13: 978-3150056394.

GER-G 577 HIST STUDY OF GERMAN LIT IV (30614)

Instructor: Rasch, William W.
Day & Time: MW 2:30 PM- 3:45 PM
Building & Room: Cedar Hall C101
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2019-01-07 End Date: 2019-05-03

Trummer: Germany 1945 The purpose of this course is threefold: 1: To familiarize students with the representation of the experience of immediate postwar Germany by means of literature, film, reportage, memoir, and secondary sources. 2: To have students familiarize themselves with and analyze (in written form) secondary research on the major themes of postwar representation as presented in the class. 3: To develop two collective syllabi, one undergraduate (in English) and one graduate (German) which deal with both primary and secondary sources. Texts in German and English. Discussion primarily in English.

GER-G 599 THESIS RESEARCH (4281)

Instructor: Gade, Kari Ellen
Day & Time: 12:00 AM- 12:00 AM
Building & Room:
Credit Hours: 0.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2019-01-07 End Date: 2019-05-03

GER-G 625 LIT AND CULTURE:SPECIAL TOPICS (11151)

Instructor: Turk, Johannes
Day & Time: W 4:00 PM- 6:15 PM
Building & Room: Lindley Hall 112
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2019-01-07 End Date: 2019-05-03

Topic: Theatricality: From Greek Tragedy to Modern Drama From its inception in classical Greece, the theatrical has been the primary mode in which the polis has represented itself, reflected its major conflicts, and assembled its world. Theater has been the major medium shaping the self-understanding of societies until well into the twentieth century. A double of the real, theatrical representation enacts and shapes central features of how we live together. In this course, we will investigate theatricality as a central mode of representation through its different forms from Greek tragedy to modern drama and film. We will read and analyze some of the most prominent dramas of the European tradition from Sophocles through Shakespeare and Corneille, Racine to Kleist, Büchner, and Brecht and end with the question of how film reconfigures the theatrical. We will also watch productions of a number of the pieces to get am impression how this tradition is alive today. We will discuss how historic transformation of political communities go hand in hand with shifts in genres, production, and staging. All texts will be read and discussed in English. The original language should be added by students according to their ability.

GER-G 815 INDIVIDUAL READINGS (2713)

Instructor: Gade, Kari Ellen
Day & Time: 12:00 AM- 12:00 AM
Building & Room:
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2019-01-07 End Date: 2019-05-03

GER-G 820 RESEARCH TUTORIAL (2714)

Instructor: Gade, Kari Ellen
Day & Time: 12:00 AM- 12:00 AM
Building & Room:
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2019-01-07 End Date: 2019-05-03

GER-G 825 SEMINAR IN GERMAN LITERATURE (8424)

Instructor: Rasch, William W.
Day & Time: TR 4:00 PM- 5:15 PM
Building & Room: Woodburn Hall 118
Credit Hours: 4.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2019-01-07 End Date: 2019-05-03

WALTER BENJAMIN IN PARIS: German Marxian Aesthetic Theory in the 1930s Purpose: Conventionally one can speak of two Walter Benjamins: the early literary critic and philosopher of language; and the later Marxist-influenced social critic and cultural historian. Speaking conventionally again, the former has been embraced by those influenced by poststructuralism and the latter by late 20th-century scholars engaged in Marxist critique, cultural studies, and new historicism. Scholars and students often take sides, elevating one ¿Benjamin¿ to near saintly status while burying the remains of the other in a paupers¿ ¿ if not sinners¿ ¿ grave. In this seminar, we will occupy ourselves with only one of the two Walters, without, however, casting any proverbial aspersions on the other. The seminar will cover the last decade of Benjamin¿s life, the era of his Marxian-influenced cultural, historical, and theoretical work on European modernity/modernism. In doing so, we will also examine a coterie of fellow travelers down the red-brick road of Marxian aesthetics, some who were close collaborators with Benjamin, others friendly but harsh critics. The purpose of this examination is twofold: to explore the history of this turbulent time and the cultural and theoretical texts that emerged from it to influence important political and cultural-theoretical work of the famed ¿68er generation; and to examine their possible continued influence and use for currently emerging critical and theoretical scholars. The first of these aims informs the selection of readings; the second will come from your response. All required texts are available in English. All discussion will be conducted in English.

GER-G 825 SEMINAR IN GERMAN LITERATURE (8428)

Instructor: Rasch, William W.
Day & Time: TR 4:00 PM- 5:15 PM
Building & Room: Woodburn Hall 118
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2019-01-07 End Date: 2019-05-03

WALTER BENJAMIN IN PARIS: German Marxian Aesthetic Theory in the 1930s Purpose: Conventionally one can speak of two Walter Benjamins: the early literary critic and philosopher of language; and the later Marxist-influenced social critic and cultural historian. Speaking conventionally again, the former has been embraced by those influenced by poststructuralism and the latter by late 20th-century scholars engaged in Marxist critique, cultural studies, and new historicism. Scholars and students often take sides, elevating one ¿Benjamin¿ to near saintly status while burying the remains of the other in a paupers¿ ¿ if not sinners¿ ¿ grave. In this seminar, we will occupy ourselves with only one of the two Walters, without, however, casting any proverbial aspersions on the other. The seminar will cover the last decade of Benjamin¿s life, the era of his Marxian-influenced cultural, historical, and theoretical work on European modernity/modernism. In doing so, we will also examine a coterie of fellow travelers down the red-brick road of Marxian aesthetics, some who were close collaborators with Benjamin, others friendly but harsh critics. The purpose of this examination is twofold: to explore the history of this turbulent time and the cultural and theoretical texts that emerged from it to influence important political and cultural-theoretical work of the famed ¿68er generation; and to examine their possible continued influence and use for currently emerging critical and theoretical scholars. The first of these aims informs the selection of readings; the second will come from your response. All required texts are available in English. All discussion will be conducted in English.

GER-G 835 SEM IN GERMANIC LINGUISTICS (30617)

Instructor: Hall, Tracy Alan
Day & Time: MW 2:30 PM- 3:45 PM
Building & Room: Wendell W. Wright 3275
Credit Hours: 4.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2019-01-07 End Date: 2019-05-03

Historical Phonology | T. A. Hall (Cross-listed with L760) This seminar will explore a number of well-known sound changes (primarily in Germanic), including (but not limited to) Grimm¿s Law, Verner¿s Law, West Germanic Gemination, the Old High German Consonant Shift, and Umlaut in Old High German. A number of linguists have applied formal models of phonology to these sound shifts, e.g. feature geometry, syllable and moraic theory, prosodic templates, optimality theory. The goal of the course is to critically examine this literature. The course presupposes some background in theoretical phonology. Each student will be required to present and lead the discussion on one of the required readings, to write a research paper, and to give an oral presentation of the research paper. The paper can either offer a re-analysis of one of the sound changes discussed in the course, or it can propose a new treatment of a different sound change. The topic of the paper need not be restricted to Germanic. The course is taught in English and does not presuppose knowledge of German.

GER-G 850 MASTER'S PROJECT (2715)

Instructor: Gade, Kari Ellen
Day & Time: 12:00 AM- 12:00 AM
Building & Room:
Credit Hours: 1.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2019-01-07 End Date: 2019-05-03

GER-G 875 RESEARCH IN GERMAN LITERATURE (2716)

Instructor: Gade, Kari Ellen
Day & Time: 12:00 AM- 12:00 AM
Building & Room:
Credit Hours: 12.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2019-01-07 End Date: 2019-05-03

GER-G 875 RESEARCH IN GERMAN LITERATURE (4632)

Instructor: Gade, Kari Ellen
Day & Time: 12:00 AM- 12:00 AM
Building & Room:
Credit Hours: 12.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2019-01-07 End Date: 2019-05-03

GER-G 885 RSRCH IN GERMANIC LINGUISTICS (4633)

Instructor: Gade, Kari Ellen
Day & Time: 12:00 AM- 12:00 AM
Building & Room:
Credit Hours: 12.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2019-01-07 End Date: 2019-05-03

GER-G 885 RSRCH IN GERMANIC LINGUISTICS (2717)

Instructor: Gade, Kari Ellen
Day & Time: 12:00 AM- 12:00 AM
Building & Room:
Credit Hours: 12.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2019-01-07 End Date: 2019-05-03

GER-G 901 ADVANCED RESEARCH (2718)

Instructor: Gade, Kari Ellen
Day & Time: 12:00 AM- 12:00 AM
Building & Room:
Credit Hours: 6.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2019-01-07 End Date: 2019-05-03

GER-K 502 BEGINNING NORWEGIAN II (2720)

Instructor: May, Gergana Gueorguieva
Day & Time: MTWF 11:15 AM- 12:05 PM
Building & Room: Woodburn Hall 104
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2019-01-07 End Date: 2019-05-03

Prerequisite: K501 with a minimum grade of C-. *This course meets with undergraduate course K150. This is a second semester language course, which will continue to introduce you to the fundamentals of the Norwegian language and will provide you with the tools to function in an everyday context. You will be able to discuss daily topics such as food, weather, housing, clothing, health, likes/dislikes, and travel. Authentic cultural materials will be used whenever possible. Class meetings are an invaluable immersion experience; therefore, your attendance and participation are essential to being successful. Homework will deal with grammar exercises, but essay writing will gradually be required. Weekly quizzes, two tests and two oral exams will count toward the final grade. Books: Required books: A. Textbook: Manne, Gerd and Gölin Kaurin Nilsen. 2013. Ny i Norge. Oslo: Fag og Kultur. ISBN 978-82-11-01495-5 B. Workbook: Manne, Gerd and Gölin Kaurin Nilsen. 2013. Ny i Norge. Oslo: Fag og Kultur. ISBN 978-82-11-01504-4 C. Vocabulary book: Manne, Gerd and Gölin Kaurin Nilsen. 2013. Ny i Norge. Oslo: Fag og Kultur. ISBN 978-82-11-01901-1 Recommended books: D. Grammar: Janus, Louis. 1996. Verbs and Essential Grammar. New York, etc: MacGraw¿Hill. ISBN 084428596X E. Dictionary Haugen, Einar. 1965. Norwegian¿English Dictionary. Madison, Wisconsin: Univ. of Wisconsin Press. ISBN 0299038742

GER-K 504 INTERMEDIATE NORWEGIAN II (32988)

Instructor: May, Gergana Gueorguieva
Day & Time: 12:00 AM- 12:00 AM
Building & Room: Bldg Not Assigned TBA
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2019-01-07 End Date: 2019-05-03

GER-K 504 INTERMEDIATE NORWEGIAN II (4280)

Instructor: Gade, Kari Ellen
Day & Time: MWF 12:20 PM- 1:10 PM
Building & Room: Hamilton Lugar Sch Global&Intn 0011
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2019-01-07 End Date: 2019-05-03

*This section meets with undergraduate course GER-K250. K250 is a fourth semester language course, which will continue to build on your existing knowledge of Norwegian, strengthening and expanding the language tools you already possess to make you able to move beyond the everyday topics and into more specialized areas of conversation. We will focus on your ability to narrate and describe in Norwegian, as well as to construct well-rounded paragraphs. Topics of discussion will include Norwegian geography, history, society, folk narrative, school-system, food and leisure. We will use mainly authentic cultural materials. You will be required to do all the readings at home. Class time will be devoted exclusively to conversation/discussion and going over specific grammar topics and exercises. Every third week there will be a test on vocabulary and/or grammar. Weekly essays will also be required. There will be no final exam, but a final written group project with accompanying oral presentations. Books: Required books: A. Ellingsen, Elisabeth og Kirsti Mac Donald. Stein på stein. Tekstbok. Oslo. Cappelen. 2014. ISBN 9788202419646 B. Ellingsen, Elisabeth og Kirsti Mac Donald. Stein på stein. Arbeidsbok. Oslo. Cappelen. 2014. ISBN 9788202427979 Recommended books: E. Grammar: Janus, Louis. 1996. Verbs and Essential Grammar. New York, etc: MacGraw¿Hill. ISBN 084428596X F. Dictionary Haugen, Einar. 1965. Norwegian¿English Dictionary. Madison, Wisconsin: Univ. of Wisconsin Press. ISBN 0299038742

GER-V 605 SEL TOPICS IN GERMAN STUDIES (33122)

Instructor: Roos, Julia
Day & Time: R 4:00 PM- 6:00 PM
Building & Room: Ballantine Hall 018
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2019-01-07 End Date: 2019-05-03

German Grammar and Structure for Musicians is intended to give students the skills to become independent and confident learners of German in the context of vocal performance in German. We will de-emphasize -- though not neglect -- expressions and vocabulary related to everyday situations and routine tasks and instead will concentrate on working to strengthen translation skills and familiarity with the grammatical structure of German. We will not undertake a systematic study of German pronunciation and phonetics, but rather address diction issues as tthey arise in classroom use. At the end of the course students will be able to: * translate texts of intermediate difficulty from German to English and thereby gain a deeper understanding of them * demonstrate competence in main areas of German grammar * build and maintain an active vocabulary of terminology and expressions central to singing and performing in German. The course is a companion course to MUS V-580 and must be taken in conjunction with it, i.e., students must enroll in both. Permission of the instructor is required. Books: Required: Josephine Barber, German for Musicians, Indiana University Press 1985, ISBN 9780253212603 Recommended: Guy Stern and Everett F. Bleiler, Essential German Grammar, Dover Publications 2015, ISBN 9780486204222

GER-V 605 SEL TOPICS IN GERMAN STUDIES (33545)

Instructor: Lawson, Julia Karin
Day & Time: MW 9:05 AM- 9:55 AM
Building & Room: Music Addition 404
Credit Hours: 2.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2019-01-07 End Date: 2019-05-03

GER-V 815 INDIV RDGS IN GERMAN STUDIES (2722)

Instructor: Turk, Johannes
Day & Time: 12:00 AM- 12:00 AM
Building & Room:
Credit Hours: 8.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2019-01-07 End Date: 2019-05-03

GER-Y 502 BEGINNING YIDDISH II (10897)

Instructor: Kerler, Dov-Ber Boris
Day & Time: MWF 9:30 AM- 10:45 AM
Building & Room: Hamilton Lugar Sch Global&Intn 3106
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2019-01-07 End Date: 2019-05-03

GER-Y 504 INTERMEDIATE YIDDISH II (12441)

Instructor: Kerler, Dov-Ber Boris
Day & Time: 12:00 AM- 12:00 AM
Building & Room:
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2019-01-07 End Date: 2019-05-03

GER-Y 506 TOPICS IN YIDDISH CULTURE (30609)

Instructor: Kerler, Dov-Ber Boris
Day & Time: MW 4:00 PM- 6:15 PM
Building & Room: Student Building (Frances Morg 140
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2019-03-04 End Date: 2019-05-03

GER-Y 815 INDIV READINGS IN YIDDISH STDS (2724)

Instructor: Kerler, Dov-Ber Boris
Day & Time: 12:00 AM- 12:00 AM
Building & Room:
Credit Hours: 4.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2019-01-07 End Date: 2019-05-03

Germanic Studies
Global and International Studies Building 3103
355 North Jordan Ave.
Bloomington, IN 47405-1105
Phone: 812-855-1553
Fax: 812-855-8927